Eriophyid mite

Sucking pests

Eriophyid mites feed deep within plant tissues, withdrawing plant fluids with their stylet-like mouthparts and injecting a toxin that deforms plant growth. Once eriophyid mite damage is evident, it is too late to save plants because the mites are already established in the plants. They tend to congregate in large numbers, feeding on all plant parts – buds, flowers and leaves.

Eriophyid mites
Eriophyid mites are microscopic (less than 0.25 mm long), and spindle-shaped with elongated bodies. They resemble cigars with the head and legs on one end.

Management

Dispose of all plants exhibiting symptoms of eriophyid mite damage. Also, remove all plants within 1 foot of damaged plants. Eriophyid mite control with miticides may be difficult because they tend to be located in hidden, hard-to-reach areas.

Eriophyid mite damage
Eriophyid mite feeding results in distorted, roughened growth on both leaves and flowers. Eriophyid mites may also cause swollen or thickened growth, leaf blistering and bronzing of infected leaves.

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The MSU IPM Program maintains this site as an access point to pest management information at MSU. The IPM Program is administered within the Department of Entomology, fueled by research from the AgBioResearch, delivered to citizens through MSU Extension, and proud to be a part of Project GREEEN.