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Tomato/Tobacco ringspot decline
Tomato ringspot virus
Tobacco ringspot virus


These diseases occur sporadically in vinifera grapes and interspecific hybrids. Labrusca grapes are resistant. In the first year of infection, a few leaves may show mottling. The second year, new growth is generally sparse because infected buds are prone to winterkill. Infected vines show shortened internodes with small, distorted leaves and sparse fruit clusters with uneven ripening. The third year, growth is very stunted and limited to basal suckers, and the vine eventually dies. Dead and dying vines are usually present in a roughly circular pattern in the vineyard.

The viruses are introduced into vineyards with infected planting stock or by dispersal of seed from infected weeds. The virus is then spread by dagger nematodes feeding on roots of infected plants. The nematodes can retain the virus for long periods. Both viruses infect common weeds such as dandelion, sheep sorrel, common chickweed and red clover. Tomato ringspot virus also infects many fruit crops. These viruses may already be present in land used to establish new vineyards.

The viruses are introduced into vineyards with infected planting stock or by dispersal of seed from infected weeds. The virus is then spread by dagger nematodes feeding on roots of infected plants. The nematodes can retain the virus for long periods.

Both viruses infect common weeds such as dandelion, sheep sorrel, common chickweed and red clover. Tomato ringspot virus also infects many fruit crops. These viruses may already be present in land used to establish new vineyards.

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The MSU IPM Program maintains this site as an access point to pest management information at MSU. The IPM Program is administered within the Department of Entomology, fueled by research from the AgBioResearch, delivered to citizens through MSU Extension, and proud to be a part of Project GREEEN.